The importance of having a schedule for a construction project

The importance of having a schedule for a construction project

Construction projects are delicate operations that need to run on time in order to stay within the allocated budget. As soon as a project is delayed, it costs the contractors and building owners more money. Having a strict schedule is important as it keeps the project on time and allows all workers to know when to expect certain deliveries and deadlines.

A schedule is the process of assigning tasks, activities, milestones and deliveries to a construction project – basically setting deadlines that everyone will work towards meeting. The schedule will be used by all construction teams on the project, as well as the suppliers, to finish the building on time. It outlines the pace of work and how the tasks are supposed to be executed, but it also outlines how the team should deal with changes in the plan and delays. 

Why a construction schedule is important

The schedule is a vital planning document that outlines the following points:

  • It assigns dates and deadlines for the project’s activities.
  • Contractors can see whether these deadlines are obtainable or not and whether delays can be avoided.
  • The schedule allows contractors to estimate preliminary costs or tender bid estimates.
  • It can be used to plan the necessary resources (such as equipment, materials and labour) to meet the work tasks and deadlines.
  • The schedule provides a sequence of tasks so the project manager and all teams know what they need to be working on and what tasks they need to be prepared for.
  • It can improve the safety performance of a project by sequencing activities to ensure maximum protection for contractors.
  • It enables teams to set their own goals and work towards achieving these.
  • It outlines how delays can be dealt with in the smoothest and most efficient manner.
  • It eliminates problems of production bottlenecks, where many deadlines fall on the same day.
  • The schedule ensures that the project is completed at the soonest possible date.
  • It gives the building owners a target date by which their building should be ready for use.
  • It can be used post-completion to evaluate the contractors’ performances and to assign responsibility for any delays or overspending.

The building schedule is one of the most important documents for project managers, contractors and building owners. It keeps a project running on time and within budget. However, the schedule needs to be realistic and the estimations need to be achievable in order for it to be a valuable resource for the project.

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LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges. 

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LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring countries with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in Mbeya, Southwest Tanzania.

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At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

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Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest for the best tips on construction, handy projects and the latest industry news. See our Instagram channel for more insights into our products.

The four phases of project management

The four phases of project management

All construction projects require input from a team of various experts. Architects, contractors, project managers and suppliers have the most important roles to play in the creation of a new building. The project manager is the link between all of these teams. It is their job to ensure the project runs smoothly, on time and within budget.

The project manager needs to be organised and keep an eye on all aspects of the building’s progress. To do this, a project manager will need to use a phased process. There are four phases of project management that will ensure the building is completed efficiently and to a high quality. 

1. Defining and organising the project

The first phase of project management is to define the task at hand – what are the objectives of the project and whose expertise will be needed to help you complete these objectives successfully. Identify the competing demands of each team working on the construction site and plan how to overcome these conflicts while keeping all teams satisfied.

Organising the project requires the manager to define the roles and responsibilities of each team. The project manager should create a detailed estimate of the costs and timeframe in which the building should be completed. This organising phase will help to keep the project on schedule for its entire duration.

2. Planning the project

The planning phase of project management is based on the previous step. In the planning phase, the project manager will assemble a team of contractors and suppliers and assign tasks to individuals. The budget can be adjusted if necessary once the plans start to take shape. The project manager must also finalise the deadlines for the construction project during the planning stage.

A communications plan is also required, so the project manager can draw one up and distribute it to each team. This will ensure that all teams know who to communicate with and what the appropriate channels of communication will be. This is the last chance to make any final changes to the plan before the actual construction process begins.

3. Executing the construction project

This is the main phase of a project – the period where the construction takes place. Each team is required to monitor and control their own costs according to the budget set out in the previous step. They must also work to meet the deadlines assigned to the project. The project manager must now oversee all the teams and ensure that everything is running smoothly.

If the project falls behind schedule or is starting to creep over the budget, the project manager must take the necessary steps to fix the situation. Remember that time is money; the longer a project takes, the more it will cost. The project manager must keep strict control over deadlines but still ensure that the quality standards are met. This phase is the most stressful for all teams involved.

4. Finishing the project

At the end of the construction process, when the last interior fittings are being installed and the walls are being painted, the project manager must evaluate the performance of all teams involved. The project manager can use a variety of documents and records to analyse the construction process. This phase will also help the manager to decide whether they are satisfied with the teams’ performances and whether or not to use them again for projects in the future.

These four phases of project management will ensure that a construction job runs on time and within the allocated budget. They will help to align the goals of the various teams and the project manager. The overall result is a well-built structure that is completed to a high degree of quality.

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LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges. 

___

LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring countries with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in Mbeya, Southwest Tanzania.

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At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

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Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest for the best tips on construction, handy projects and the latest industry news. See our Instagram channel for more insights into our products.

Finding the right size of crushed stone for your construction project

Finding the right size of crushed stone for your construction project

Crushed stone aggregate comes in a variety of sizes and shapes that are suited to various applications in a construction project. Contractors cannot assume that any sized stone will work for their structures. They need to understand the key differences between the various types and sizes of aggregate needed for construction.

For example, you should use large stones for a smooth path, otherwise, the stones would make the surface bumpy and difficult to walk on. Likewise, using large stones were small stones are actually needed could increase the overall building costs unnecessarily. Large stones are heavier and more expensive to transport, so they are less practical for certain building projects.

Choosing the correctly-sized stone for the job will ensure that a concrete structure is finished to a higher quality and standard. These buildings will be stronger, more durable and keep their value for longer. When planning a project, be sure to choose the right size of crushed stone aggregate.

Types of crushed stone

  • Crushed and screened – This is the most basic type of crushed stone that you can get. Large granite rocks are crushed and the various chipped stones are fed into a screen filter that separates them into specific sizes. These stones are not cleaned or treated, so may carry some excess rock dust.
  • Washed clean – These are crushed and screened stones that are fed into a washer to remove the rock dust and any additional mud or debris. These stones are clean and do not have any contaminants that could affect dam projects or a concrete batch.
  • Gravel – This is a smoother form of crushed stone that is often used for landscaping projects and to make stone pathways. Gravel comes in a variety of sizes and is more suited to decorative purposes than functional building applications.
  • Quarry process – This type of crushed stone is also known as ‘dense-grade aggregate’. It is a combination of stone dust and crushed stone aggregate of various sizes. The stone dust makes the batch more dense as it fills the spaces between the stone chips.
  • Riprap stone – This is one of the largest types of coarse aggregate. Some of the pieces can be as large as 23 centimetres in diameter. These mini-boulders are often used in heavy concrete applications, such as high-rise foundations and bases for large roads.
  • Stone grits – These are fine particles of stone that are a by-product of the crushing process. They are 5 millimetres or less in diameter and are technically the smallest size of coarse aggregate available (before being classified as rock dust).

Crushed stone sizes and their uses

Small crushed stone (5mm or less) is often used as a functional surface layer on top of a compacted base for landscaping and decorative purposes. This size of stone is ideal for paths, driveways, patios, parking lots, water features and concrete pots.

Medium crushed stone (5mm to 2cm) is ideal for use as a layer on top of a larger crushed stone foundation. The medium stones will settle into the gaps between the larger stones and provide a stable and supportive layer for concrete. Medium crushed stone is also used in most general concrete applications for buildings.

Large crushed stone (2cm to 6cm) is ideal for foundations and filling sub-bases for roads, pavements and airport runways. These large rock particles give a strong and durable base support for concrete and bricks. Sometimes large crushed stone is used for decorative landscaping purposes or to build retaining walls with mortar.

Mixed crushed stone (variety of the sizes above) is often used to build solid foundations for most buildings. It can also be used to build semi-permanent roads and driveway surfaces, such as dirt roads to remote villages and walking trails. Mixed crushed stone is a dense and compact mix that creates solid surfaces as the smaller particles settle into the gaps between the larger particles.

These guidelines should help contractors to choose the right size of crushed stone for their needs. Not all crushed stone is the same, and certain structures call for a certain size of particle. Most general concreting jobs require medium crushed stone. The right size of aggregate can improve the quality and durability of concrete and building projects.

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LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges. 

___

LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring countries with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in Mbeya, Southwest Tanzania.

___

At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

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Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest for the best tips on construction, handy projects and the latest industry news. See our Instagram channel for more insights into our products.

How to estimate the number of bricks needed for a project

How to estimate the quantity of bricks needed for a project

Before any brickwork construction can begin, the contractor first needs to order the building materials (bricks, cement, sand, etc.) and have them delivered to the site. To do this, an accurate estimation will need to be made of the volumes of building materials that will be required. The contractor has to consider how many bricks are needed for the total area of the building.

When making estimations, contractors often work out the number of bricks needed to fill a space of one cubic metre. Clay bricks tend to have a standard size (roughly 222mm long by 106mm wide by 73mm high). For one cubic metre of standard-sized brick masonry, a contractor will need 494 bricks. This equates to about 60 bricks per square metre of single-brick wall or 120 bricks per square metre of double-brick wall.

The contractor needs to calculate the volume (for a double-brick wall) or area (for a single-brick wall) by multiplying the width, length and height. This can be done according to the architect’s drawings. Once the contractor knows the area of the wall, they can use the above guidelines to place an order. They can multiply the area by 60 (for a single-brick wall) or by 120 (for a double brick wall).

Once the number of bricks has been calculated according to the size of the wall, contractors should always add a 10% allowance on top of that number. This takes into account any additional bricks needed for verges, pillars or to replace broken ones. It is always better to have a few extra bricks than not enough.

The contractor will also need to estimate the quantity of mortar needed for one cubic metre of masonry. On average, buildings will require between 0.25 and 0.3 cubic metres of mortar per cubic metre of brick. This means that between 25% and 30% of brickwork consists of mortar (or sand and cement).

Contractors can use these estimations as a guideline to know how many bricks will need to be ordered and what volume of sand and cement to have delivered. Running out of building materials will cause time delays and cost the contractor money. However, builders do not want to have hundreds of bricks leftover at the end of a project either.

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LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges. 

___

LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring countries with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in Mbeya, Southwest Tanzania.

___

At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

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Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest for the best tips on construction, handy projects and the latest industry news. See our Instagram channel for more insights into our products.

Work sequence in construction projects

Work sequence in construction projects

All construction projects should follow a set sequence of jobs in order to complete the building on-time and within budget. This work sequence is an important process for a number of reasons, but mainly because it helps to establish order between construction teams. 

By following the sequence, contractors can plan the project and know what to expect next. The major sequences of construction are marking, excavation, concreting, bricklaying, roof building and finishing. There are more minor steps in between these processes, which have been outlined below. 

Work sequence in building construction

1. Paperwork – Any construction project will begin with paperwork. This includes architectural drawings, planning permission, costings and outlining the project process. Contractors need to ensure that their paperwork is completed properly (in accordance with regulations and laws) and filed correctly. Documents need to be easily accessible when they are needed, so the filing is just as important as the completion of paperwork.

2. Marking and outlining – Once the building and paperwork have been approved, the contractors can start to mark the outline of the structure on the ground. The dimensions and orientation of the building are marked according to the architectural drawings. Once the outlines have been marked, the ground can be prepared for the next step.

3. Excavation – Now the building process can really begin. The foundations are excavated along the outlines drawn in the previous step. Excavations should be carried out according to the planning documents. Contractors should work carefully to match the exact dimensions of the trenches and floor spaces.

4. Foundation work – Building the foundations is a precise process that follows this sequence:

  • Compacting the ground – The trenches are dug and the ground is compressed using tampers and rollers.
  • Pouring concrete – Plain cement-based concrete is then laid on top of the compacted soil. The depth of the concrete depends on the nature of the foundation.
  • Footing reinforcement – Steel rebar is tied together and placed on the concrete base to form a skeleton for the foundations. 
  • Formwork – To achieve the proper shape of the concrete, formwork is constructed according to the planning documents. This formwork also helps to keep the concrete from coming into contact with the surrounding soil.
  • Footing – Concrete is poured into the formwork to create solid footings upon which the building will stand. Once the concrete is cured, construction can take place on top of the footing.

5. Column casting – Concrete columns are then built on top of the foundations. Formwork is built around steel rebar skeletons; wet concrete is poured into the formwork, around the rebar. The formwork is removed after 24 hours and the columns are left to cure.

6. Wall construction – Once the concrete columns are in place, they are connected by the construction of the walls. These walls can be made from concrete, wood, brick or composite materials. The base of the wall is built first using concrete. The height of the wall is determined by the architectural drawings. 

7. Lintel construction – Lintels are concrete beams that sit above gaps for doors and windows. These reinforced concrete beams are poured and set on the ground, then hoisted into place above door frames and windows using a crane. They need to be strong to support the weight of the walls above, without any support from below.

8. Roofing – Once the walls and bricklaying are complete, contractors can start building the roof. Whether concrete slabs are used, or wooden trusses and tiles, the roof is the final layer of any building. They will be built according to the planning documents.

9. Plastering – Once the basic structure is complete, contractors can now prepare the building for the final touches. Walls and ceilings can be plastered to give them a smooth appearance. Special mortar is used for plastering, such as TemboFundi. The thickness of the plaster should never be more than 2cm as it becomes heavy and prone to cracking. Leave the plaster to cure for seven days.

10. Installing doors and windows – Next, contractors can start to install the doors and windows beneath the lintels. The metal frames are installed first and then the doors or windows are attached to the frames.

11. Installing electrics and plumbing – The necessary wiring, lighting, piping and water outlets are then installed. These should be completed before painting and tiling.

12. Tiling and painting – Tiles need to be installed in the kitchen, bathroom and any other room that will not be carpeted. If the walls are being tiled too, complete the walls before installing the floor tiles. Then, the non-tiled walls can be painted using two coats of primer and two coats of paint. The paint is applied directly on top of plastered walls – inside and outside the building.

14. Miscellaneous projects – Once all of the above tasks have been completed, contractors can then worry about the minor jobs, such as terracing, landscaping, interior decorating and final installation of appliances and carpets. The planning documents should outline what these minor jobs entail.

By following this work sequence, a contractor can complete a project efficiently and orderly. It will also help to plan the teams of builders, painters, electricians, plumbers and tilers. This work sequence is widely used around the world, so it has been tried and tested.

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LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges. 

___

LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring countries with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in Mbeya, Southwest Tanzania.

___

At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

___

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest for the best tips on construction, handy projects and the latest industry news. See our Instagram channel for more insights into our products.

How to estimate the costs of a construction project

How to estimate the costs of a construction project

Working out all the costs involved in a construction project is very complicated and requires many factors to be considered. This skill of estimating costs takes a lot of time to learn. Studies, the right training, as well as practical experience is required in order to become efficient at estimating costs for construction projects.

There are many aspects of a building project that can influence the costs. The cost estimator should be familiar with all these factors. All aspects should be evaluated in detail before finalising a construction cost estimate. It is important to do the relevant research and to familiarise yourself with all of these factors before making a cost estimation.

Important factors to consider when estimating construction costs

  • The cost of similar projects – It is very helpful to study the cost estimates for similar projects. Study the final cost items and related expenses of other projects, similar to the project you are working on – it will be of tremendous help.
  • The costs of materials – The cost of supplies and materials, as well as their transport, must be calculated before you start the estimation process.
  • Inflation – If you are using previous, similar projects as a starting point for estimating costs, always remember to factor in inflation (the price increases and the decrease of the purchasing value of money over time).
  • The cost of labour – Work out the labour costs for your project in accordance to local labour rates, or as stipulated by your local government.
  • The conditions at the site – This can include things like the environmental sensitivity of the area, poor soil conditions, the presence of groundwater, archaeological sites or contaminated materials, as well as conflicting utilities, like buried pipes, cables, overhead lines, and so on.
  • Timing of the bid – Things like the seasonal time of year, as well as conflicts with other bid openings, can have a big impact on the cost of the project.
  • Plans and specifications – It is very important that all plans and specifications are well prepared, with every detail and aspect of the layout and design executed and fully described.
  • Project schedule – The timeline of the project is a critical factor. If it needs to be completed very quickly, this will generally make the project more expensive – in particular if a liquidated damages condition for failure to complete within a specified deadline is included in the contract.
  • Project engineer – Working with an engineering firm or project engineer that has a good reputation in the industry will ensure a smooth-running project, but might increase the costs. Keep in mind that, if a contractor enjoys working with a certain engineer or firm, the project will be more cost efficient and also likely run smoother.
  • Size of the project – The larger the project, the more bidders will likely be involved and the higher the costs. The size of the project will determine whether local contractors will have the capacity to do the work.
  • Granting agency – If a granting agency is involved in providing funding for a project, this will be taken into consideration when a contractor is preparing his or her bid. This might involve extra administration and paperwork, which can increase the cost of the bid.
  • Location of the work site – The location of the construction site is a big factor in working out a realistic cost estimate. If the location is remote, enough labourers to do the work may be scarce and labour will have to be imported, so driving up costs.
  • Contingency factors – Usually, a 10% contingency amount on the construction total is added to cover unforeseen costs that may arise as the project progresses. When inflation is at a high, or essential construction materials are limited, it may be best to play it safe and increase the contingency amount to 15% or 20%.
  • Regulatory requirements – Certain conditions in regulatory agency approvals can be costly. To reassure potential bidders, it is recommended to include all regulatory approvals in all bidding documents.
  • Value engineering – Certain agencies require that high-cost projects perform a value engineering review, before the design is finalised or before the bidding process proceeds. The estimator must be aware of this factor early on in the process.
  • Insurance requirements – A contractor’s general liability, performance bonds and payments are general insurance requirements, as well as normal costs of doing business. However, certain projects require additional coverage. Such insurance premiums (for supplemental policies) add to the cost of the project and must be factored in right from the beginning.

Cost estimation research is essential

Sound technical judgment is of utmost importance during the cost estimation process – this will come with experience, as well as from the mentoring of other experienced industry role players. It is imperative that research is undertaken to take all relevant factors into account when drawing up a cost estimate for a construction project. A detailed and thorough cost estimate will result in a smooth-running operation with the best possible outcome for all parties. 

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LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges. 

___

LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring countries with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in Mbeya, Southwest Tanzania.

___

At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

___

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest for the best tips on construction, handy projects and the latest industry news. See our Instagram channel for more insights into our products.

Building relationships between contractors and architects

Building relationships between contractors and architects

A successful construction project requires a healthy relationship between architects and contractors. The architect is responsible for the initial design and layout of the building, as well as overseeing that all work is completed according to their vision. The contractors are responsible for the actual process of building the structure itself.

These two job responsibilities go hand-in-hand and both need to work with each other in order for a project to finish on-time. It is important to have a good working relationship between architects and contractors for the following reasons:

  • It helps the construction project to run smoothly and efficiently.
  • It will minimise stress for both teams.
  • It will ensure effective communication throughout the project.
  • It will minimise disagreements and delays.
  • It can help to guarantee more work for both teams in the future.

Sometimes the relationship between architects and contractors is hostile. When these two teams do not agree with one another, it can cause severe problems for a project. It can lead to miscommunications, which then leads to building delays and additional expenses. Here are some tips that will help to strengthen the relationship between architects and contractors.

1. Know each other’s needs and priorities

Different teams have different priorities when it comes to construction projects. Architects and contractors have different skills and tasks that they need to complete as quickly as possible. An architect is focused on the design concept and whether the actual building is constructed according to his or her design. A contractor will prioritise deadlines, the supply chain and his or her employees.

Recognise these differences and understand that conflict can come from one team’s priorities being neglected. Architects need to understand that contractors have more to worry about than the exact design of the building. Contractors need to understand that building according to the architect’s design will ensure that everything fits and that there are no delays.

2. Address budget and cost problems as soon a possible

One of the biggest causes of disagreements on a building site is budgetary disputes. An architect will often design a building with the functionality and look in mind. A contractor will be more concerned with keeping costs to a minimum. This often results in disputes as the architect will want premium quality finishings, but the contractor will want to reduce costs wherever possible.

When it comes to budgets and financial problems, architects and contractors don’t often see eye-to-eye. But the two teams need to work with each other to find a common solution as soon as possible. The architect and the contractor need to agree with one another and address budgetary concerns early in the process. Working as a team will ensure the success of the project.

3. Communicate openly and often

In any working relationship, communication is key. Architects and contractors need to openly discuss issues and concerns without fear. This will help to strengthen the partnership and build trust. Open communication relies on honesty and understanding. Both teams need to be absolutely clear with one another when it comes to resources, budgets and capabilities.

These three simple points should be kept in mind when working with other teams on a construction project. They will help architects and contractors to work alongside each other happily and efficiently. By leaning on a good relationship, a building project will run smoothly and with minimal delays. This helps to keep costs down and will allow the project to be completed on time.

___

LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges. 

___

LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring countries with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in Mbeya, Southwest Tanzania.

___

At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

___

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest for the best tips on construction, handy projects and the latest industry news. See our Instagram channel for more insights into our products.

LafargeHolcim Tanzania: the foundation for sustainable road construction

Road construction in Taznania

LafargeHolcim Tanzania has had a strong impact on the local communities living in the country through our building materials and cement products. We work alongside communities, contractors and local governments to invest in infrastructure and improve the quality of buildings in Tanzania.

One of the current projects that we have been working on is the road upgrade from Sumbawanga to Kasanga Port via Mtai. LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been chosen as the cement supplier for this 122 kilometre stretch of road that will be completed to international standards.

Our Tembo SupaSet and FastaPlus cement products have been supplied in bulk deliveries to the contractors. Approximately 5000 tonnes of cement have been delivered on-time to keep the project running smoothly. LafargeHolcim also offers value-added services such as bulk storage containers and silos to keep the cement dry.

To date, a new layer of asphalt bitumen has already been spread over about 100km of the road. Contractors have stabilised the base of the road to upgrade its load-bearing capacity so that it can support heavy trucks and vehicles travelling to the Kasanga Port on Lake Tanganyika.

This road upgrade will lead to an improvement for the local economy as more goods can be shipped to and from the port. The surrounding communities will benefit from jobs and improved access to the area.

___

LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges.

___

LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring countries with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in the Mbeya Region in Southwest Tanzania.

___

At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

___

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest for the best tips on construction, handy projects and the latest industry news. See our Instagram channel for more insights into our products.

Benefits of international experience in local markets: Biolands International

International business building school in Tanzania

LafargeHolcim Tanzania has strong international connections through the global LafargeHolcim group. This access to international experience has many benefits for the company, including working alongside multinational businesses operating in Tanzania.

Biolands International Limited, a certified organic cocoa producer and exporter, has recently undertaken an infrastructure development project in Tanzania. The company is constructing new schools and hospitals in several communities around Kyela. Biolands International is working alongside LafargeHolcim Tanzania to improve the living standards for local citizens.

Tembo cement used in the project

This infrastructure development project will use Tembo FastaPlus cement, which is manufactured by LafargeHolcim Tanzania in Mbeya. In addition, a LafargeHolcim Tanzania soil-stabilised brick machine is being used to create the bricks for the construction of the schools and hospitals.

Working with multinational companies helps to boost the local economy. Local products are used in the development project and new jobs are created for Tanzanians. The educational and medical facilities are also being improved to a high standard as a result of this project.

Biolands International Limited

Biolands International specialises in producing and exporting organic cocoa. The company also offers organic cocoa smallholder programmes for local farmers wanting to grow the plant in Mbeya and Ruvuma. Cocoa is the major ingredient in chocolate.

Biolands International provides training and technical advice for farmers in the industry. They also supply quality cocoa seedlings that guarantee better crops and improve income for farmers. The company was founded in 1999 and, like LafargeHolcim Tanzania, it is based in Mbeya.

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LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges.

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LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring countries with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in the Mbeya Region at Songwe in Southwest Tanzania.

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At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

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Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest for the best tips on construction, handy projects and the latest industry news. See our Instagram channel for more insights into our products.

How to calculate volume of concrete needed for a project

New concrete city skyscraper with volume cranes

Don’t run out of building materials mid-construction

No matter what project you’re working on, whether big or small, it’s important to order enough cement and aggregates to make enough concrete to complete the project. It can be a problem if you run out of concrete halfway through construction.

Concrete items that are set in a single pour are far stronger and will last many years. To avoid running out of concrete before the end of a project, you need to calculate how much cement, sand and gravel to order from suppliers.

Calculating the volume of concrete

To accurately calculate how much concrete the project requires, you’ll need a tape measure, notepad, pen and a calculator. Firstly, use the tape measure to take measurements of the area where you plan to place the concrete. Write down the length, width and height (or depth) of the project area.

Use the calculator to work out the volume of the area by multiplying the three measurements together (length x width x height). If you measured the three lengths in metres, then your answer will be the volume in cubic metres. For measurements in centimetres, divide the answer by one million to get an answer in cubic metres.

For example:

  • 15m (length) x 4.5m (width) x 0.2m (height) = 13.5 cubic metres
  • Or; 1,500cm (length) x 450cm (width) x 20cm (height) = 13,500,000 ÷ 1,000,000 = 13.5 cubic metres

Things to remember when ordering cement

Whether you order pre-mixed concrete or the raw materials to make concrete (cement, sand, stone), there are a couple of things to consider. Firstly, add 10% to your calculation. It’s always better to have more concrete than not enough. This extra 10% will also help with spillage or small errors in your measurements.

To work out 10%, multiply your volume by 0.1 and add the answer to your original volume. For example:

  • 13.5 cubic metres x 0.1 = 1.35
  • 1.35 + 13.5 = 14.85 cubic metres

Also, remember that different cement powders require different ratios of aggregates. Choose the right cement for your needs and then work out how much sand and stone you’ll need for the bags you buy. LafargeHolcim Tanzania can help you work these out.

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LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges.

___

LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring nations with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in the Mbeya Region at Songwe in Southwest Tanzania.

___

At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

___

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest for the best tips on construction, handy projects and the latest industry news. See our Instagram channel for more insights into our products.