Why brick and cement are sustainable building options

Why brick and cement are sustainable building options

Brick and cement are some of the most common building materials used in the construction industry. They are both sustainable materials that are made from natural elements. Cement is largely made up of limestone and other minerals, while bricks are made from clay and soil. LafargeHolcim Tanzania manufactures Tembo cement at its facility in Mbeya. Many of the bricks in Tanzania are made at small-scale plants.

Clay is an abundant natural element, but some bricks can be made with shale, soil (for soil-stabilised concrete blocks) or recycled brick dust. Similarly, post-industrial waste products, such as fly ash, silica fume and slag, can be used to make cement. Brick and cement can be manufactured from a variety of materials but their long-term strength and durability make them sustainable construction materials.

Brick manufacturing process

Brick-making facilities are usually set up close to the source of the raw materials. The process of making bricks is quite simple and it produces very little waste materials. Wet clay is packed into brick moulds and compressed. The wet bricks are removed from the mould and placed in a large oven which bakes the clay into the hard brick. 

Unfired clay is easily recycled into new bricks by simply wetting it and mixing it in with the raw materials. Fired bricks that are cracked or damaged can be crushed and recycled back into the production process, or used as a landscaping and rubble material. The brick ovens are normally fuelled by natural gas, although coal and wood are sometimes used in small-scale operations.

Bricks can be manufactured anywhere in the world, so they are usually sold to local markets within the same region as where they are manufactured. This means that less fuel is needed for transport and fewer carbon emissions are released into the air. The recyclability and durability of bricks make them sustainable building materials.

Brick and cement construction is eco-friendly

Once the bricks are sold to contractors, there is only a small amount of waste that is generated by brick construction. Only partial bricks, cracked bricks and unused cement mortar are the waste products from brick construction – all of which can be recycled into rubble for other building projects.

Brick masonry is a good insulator, which means that cool air can be kept inside on hot days and warm air can be kept inside on cold nights. The insulating properties of clay bricks and cement help to reduce the need for air conditioning or heating units, which use electricity and can be a source of air pollutants.

When a building has reached the end of its useful life, the bricks can be carefully deconstructed and reused in other building projects. Damaged bricks and mortar can be used for rubble or landscaping purposes. Brick masonry requires very little maintenance and the buildings can last for centuries. This makes brick and cement construction a sustainable building option for contractors.

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LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges. 

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LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring countries with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in Mbeya, Southwest Tanzania.

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At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

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Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest for the best tips on construction, handy projects and the latest industry news. See our Instagram channel for more insights into our products.

New energy-saving technologies for buildings

New energy-saving technologies for buildings

Sustainability is becoming a more popular way of doing things. Reducing waste, conserving electricity and having a lower impact on the environment are necessary changes that people are starting to make. The construction industry is no exception. Sustainability has driven the advancement of new energy-saving technologies in buildings.

Some of these technologies include LED lighting, modern insulation, reflective roofing materials, heating and cooling systems, as well as waste-to-energy generation. These are new ways of building homes and office spaces that reduce the building’s impact on the environment. Here are some of the new energy-saving technologies being used by contractors currently:

Connected and Smart Buildings

Some homes and office spaces have an integrated wireless system that automatically controls various aspects of the building. Sensors can detect and make a change to air conditioning and heating systems, the lighting circuits, geysers and a variety of other elements that require energy. These automated systems can reduce the energy consumption of a building by switching units off when they are not needed.

Advancements in window technology

When one thinks of technology, they probably do not think about glass windows. New adhesive coatings can be applied to windows that change colour in bright sunlight – like glasses that dim themselves when the wearer steps into the sun. This technology is being used on modern high-rise buildings already.

These coatings reduce glare inside the building, cut down external light and heat reflections from the windows and lower the internal temperature of the building. This helps to save energy on cooling systems during the day. At night, the colour coating returns to its transparent state, allowing the maximum amount of light into the building. 

Energy-saving lighting circuits

Most modern buildings are being fitted with energy-efficient LED lights, as opposed to fluorescent tubes or traditional light bulbs. LED lights use just 10% of the energy needed to power an incandescent bulb. This means that buildings with LED lighting circuits are 90% more efficient – and homeowners can change their bulbs themselves.

Another lighting system currently being used requires no energy during the day. Light pipe systems use a light collector to ‘pipe’ the light falling on the roof to the interior spaces of the building. The sunlight travels through these reflective pipes and is dispersed inside the building, similar to how a skylight works. These systems use zero electricity during the day, but conventional lighting will be needed at night.

Eco-friendly insulation

A new type of foam insulation is being installed on modern buildings. This insulation is made from environmentally-friendly materials and advanced composites. The insulation helps to regulate the internal temperature of a building. It keeps the building cool on hot days and traps the heat inside on cold days. Insulation is a vital part of building in colder climates, but Tanzanian contractors also use it to keep homes cool in our hot climate.

Electricity and heat generation

New technologies have been developed that enable the cogeneration of electricity and heat from the same unit. The electricity powers all the lights and wall sockets while the heat from the generator is captured and used to heat geysers and wall-mounted heating systems. This cogeneration minimises energy wastage.

Another electricity generation technique currently being used in Africa is waste-to-energy. This is a system whereby household and organic waste is burned in a furnace. The heat is then used to power an electricity generator, effectively turning waste into power. These systems are being installed at shopping malls, hotels and office spaces where there is enough waste produced to run the system.

Reflective roofing materials

Like the window coatings that help to regulate internal temperatures of buildings, new reflective paint is being used on the roofs of high-rise buildings. Contractors spray this coating on the roof to reflect the sun’s light and heat. This lowers the heat absorption of the roof and cools down the interior of the building.

These technologies are just a few of the modern advancements being used in construction today. They are making our cities and suburbs more efficient, saving money for owners and lowering the environmental impact of human activity. Sustainable technologies such as these are the future.

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LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges. 

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LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring countries with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in Mbeya, Southwest Tanzania.

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At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

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Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest for the best tips on construction, handy projects and the latest industry news. See our Instagram channel for more insights into our products.

How to minimise concrete wastage on-site

How to minimise concrete wastage on-site

In any construction project, there is likely to be concrete wastage – a small percentage of the concrete that gets dropped on the floor, left on the mixing bed or left unused. These small amounts of concrete wastage still add up to some loss in costs for the contractor, so they need to be minimised as much as possible.

Around three to five percent of concrete is usually wasted on an average building project. However, even this amount can increase the cost of the project. Proper planning and taking extra care when mixing and working with concrete are the best ways to reduce wastage on-site. However, there are several other steps that contractors can take to minimise concrete loss.

Pre-pour checks can minimise concrete wastage

Firstly, pre-pour concrete checks should be conducted to ensure that the site is prepared properly. There should be minimal travel distance between the site where concrete is mixed and where it will be poured. This will reduce the chances of spillage on the way to the pour site. 

Concrete pour cards should be completed as this will inform workers exactly how much concrete needs to be prepared for the job. These cards will ensure that no extra concrete is mixed, which will go to waste when it is not needed for the project. Contractors need to calculate the volume of concrete needed, as accurately as possible, before the pour takes place.

Steps to take during the pour

While the concrete is being poured, contractors should aim to match the speed of mixing with the speed of pouring. In other words, new concrete batches should be mixed just in time for use, when the old batch runs out. This will reduce any waiting time between pours, where the concrete will start to set before it is used.

Towards the end of the concrete pour, the contractors who are mixing the batches need to be informed. This will allow them to stop mixing new concrete in time and to avoid extra concrete supply that will go to waste. Communication is a key factor in minimising concrete wastage during the pour.

In situations where unexpected delays and issues stop the concrete pour, the supervisor needs to have a plan for the concrete being mixed. Using mechanical mixers can help in these situations as they continue to churn the mix and prevent it from setting. Manually mixing concrete can be affected by delays in a pour.

Contractors should always aim to use any leftover concrete elsewhere on the site in order to avoid wastage. This is why planning, communication and timing are such important factors on any construction project. Steps need to be taken before and during a concrete pour to minimise the wastage on-site.

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LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges. 

___

LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring countries with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in Mbeya, Southwest Tanzania.

___

At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

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Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest for the best tips on construction, handy projects and the latest industry news. See our Instagram channel for more insights into our products.

LafargeHolcim Group cement is carbon efficient

LafargeHolcim Group cement is carbon efficient

The global LafargeHolcim Group manufactures some of the most carbon-efficient cement products in the world. Since 1990, the group has reduced its net carbon emissions per tonne of cement by 25%. This represents the highest reduction of all cement companies worldwide since 1990.

This carbon emissions reduction was achieved by reducing our clinker content in cement and by using alternative fuels to fire our cement kilns. Alternative fuels release less carbon dioxide than the traditional fuel (coal). This means that LafargeHolcim consumes less energy per tonne of cement produced, making our production process more efficient than it was 30 years ago.

The group has also managed to reduce carbon emissions by one percent since 2017, which currently exceeds our year-on-year targets. This initiative puts LafargeHolcim on-track to meet its 2030 objective of reaching an emissions level of just 520 kilogrammes of carbon dioxide per tonne of cement produced.

We currently produce 576 kilogrammes of carbon dioxide per tonne of cement produced. The group has an interim target in 2022 of 560 kilogrammes of carbon dioxide per tonne of cement produced. These ambitious targets are within our reach and we aim to lead the way in carbon efficiency.

Clinker substitution

The production of clinker – the main component of cement – is where the majority of carbon emissions result. This is an unavoidable process during the chemical reactions but we can work to reduce these emissions as much as possible. Replacing the clinker in our cement products with alternative mineral components, such as pozzolana, fly ash and slag, will help to minimise our carbon emissions.

Many of the alternative minerals are byproducts of other industrial processes. We can recycle them into cementitious materials as replacements for clinker and to serve as a viable end-market for waste products from other industries. In certain countries with favourable markets, LafargeHolcim has replaced up to 50% clinker with alternative minerals.

Waste-derived fuels for kilns

Another major way to reduce our carbon emissions during cement production is to use waste-derived fuels to fire our kilns. The combustible materials serve as replacements for fossil fuels, such as diesel, natural gas and oil. LafargeHolcim Tanzania uses a combination of rice husks and coffee husks from nearby agricultural facilities as an alternative source of fuel for our kilns.

Carbon efficiency

Being carbon-efficient also means becoming energy efficient. Cement production is an energy-intensive operation. Improving our energy efficiency will also help to reduce the carbon intensity of the manufacturing process, lowering production costs at the same time.

The LafargeHolcim Group has reduced its overall energy consumption per tonne of clinker produced from 4532 megajoules in 1990 to 3518 megajoules in 2018. This represents some of the lowest energy rates in the global industry. Since 1990, LafargeHolcim has increased its cement production by 75% while our annual energy consumption has reduced by 18%.

Becoming more carbon-efficient is one of the main goals of the LafargeHolcim Group. We will continue to push to minimise our carbon dioxide emissions while manufacturing world-class cement products at a reduced cost. The group is on its way to meeting the 2030 targets for energy efficiency and carbon reductions.

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LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges. 

___

LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring countries with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in Mbeya, Southwest Tanzania.

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At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

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Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest for the best tips on construction, handy projects and the latest industry news. See our Instagram channel for more insights into our products.

Different ways to use recycled concrete at home

Different ways to use recycled concrete at home

In the construction industry, large quantities of waste material are often generated through the course of the project. Did you know that a lot of this material could be repurposed or recycled? It is ideal for projects around the home and the garden and it also prevents waste from ending up in landfills.

Concrete is a material that is ideal for recycling – it is 100% recyclable. At construction sites, recycled concrete is often available for free – some contractors will even deliver the concrete to your house. Concrete is inexpensive and durable and can be repurposed in various ways. Here are some examples of uses for recycled concrete:

Raising garden beds above ground

There are many benefits to raising a garden bed a few inches above the surrounding soil. It improves the soil drainage and also helps to warm soil so that seeds germinate quicker in spring. Raising garden beds 30 to 50 centimetres high will make it easier for people with limited mobility (like older people or physically challenged individuals) to do gardening.

Walkways and garden paths

Build new paths and walkways around your home and yard by using concrete paving stones or pieces of rubble. Try to get rubble from a single demolition site for your project. This will make it easier to find pieces of the same thickness, which makes it easier to handle and work with. Keep in mind that walkways built from separate pieces of recycled concrete (from various demolition sites) will have many gaps for rainwater to soak into the ground.

Aggregate and drainage

Sometimes a project requires small pieces of aggregate – materials used for mixing with cement, bitumen, lime, gypsum or other adhesive to form concrete. Many municipalities have companies that recycle old concrete into small pieces of aggregate. This aggregate is inexpensive and very useful for poured-concrete projects. 

These small particles of aggregate also make good drainage materials. You can use it as an alternative to gravel in wet areas. For example, you can dig a trench through an area where water collects. Then fill this area with concrete aggregate that surrounds a perforated PVC drainage pipe. Cover the pipe with more concrete and place the soil back.

Garden terraces and retaining walls

You can use the same technique on sloping hills to build retaining walls to prevent erosion. You can also create a terraced garden with planting sites this way. In each area where you want to build a piece of wall, dig and level a space as wide and deep as you wish to plant.

To add stability, place a layer of broken-up concrete or gravel at the base. Then stack the layers of recycled concrete. Add soil between the layers to fill in any uneven spots. When you are finished, add soil to the retaining area where you wish to plant.

Concrete is a sustainable building material. It is completely recyclable and can be used in many ways in home construction projects. Consider these uses for old concrete in your home and take advantage of a cost-effective building material.

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LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges. 

___

LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring countries with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in Mbeya, Southwest Tanzania.

___

At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

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Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest for the best tips on construction, handy projects and the latest industry news. See our Instagram channel for more insights into our products.

LafargeHolcim Group global initiatives

LafargeHolcim Group global initiatives

LafargeHolcim is a worldwide leader in building materials and construction solutions. As such, the group strives to ensure that it is a responsible and ethical business in every single country in which it operates, including Tanzania. LafargeHolcim is a member of several global initiatives and alliances that are intended to develop surrounding communities and the business environment.

Sustainability is one of the core values held by the LafargeHolcim Group and is one of the initiatives that we endorse fully. This creates added value and has numerous benefits for our operations, shareholders and communities. Some of the other global alliances and initiatives are outlined below.

Global Reporting Initiative (GRI)

The LafargeHolcim Group is a member of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) community and supports the goal of GRI to empower leaders and decision-makers around the world. The GRI has set Sustainability Reporting Standards that encourage business leaders to push for sustainable business practices and unlock the economic potential that comes along with it. The information in LafargeHolcim’s annual Sustainability Reports and website is prepared in accordance with GRI standards. 

United Nations Global Compact (UNGC)

LafargeHolcim aims to embrace all of the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC) principles through our integrated approach to sustainable development. There are 10 UNGC principles and we strive to use them as the basis for advancing responsible corporate citizenship. The UNGC also enables LafargeHolcim to push its own programmes and processes in the areas of human rights, labour standards, the environment and anti-corruption.

Global Cement and Concrete Association (GCCA)

LafargeHolcim partnered with eight other multinational companies in the cement and building materials industry to launch the Global Cement and Concrete Association (GCCA) in early 2018. The GCCA is a progressive association that is dedicated to developing the industry’s contribution to construction. The association focuses on driving advancements in sustainable construction, as well as working to enhance the cement industry’s contribution to a number of global social and developmental challenges.

FTSE4Good

The FTSE4Good index was launched by the global index provider FTSE Russell. This index series is intended to measure the performance of companies that demonstrate strong environmental, social and governance practices. The FTSE4Good indices are used by a range of market participants to create responsible investment funds. FTSE Russell confirms that LafargeHolcim has been independently assessed according to the FTSE4Good criteria and has met the necessary requirements.

Dow Jones Sustainability Indices (DJSI)

LafargeHolcim was included in the 2018 DJSI European Index and was one of two Europe-based multinationals in the building materials industry to be included in this index. DJSI are the longest-running global sustainability benchmarks and are considered to be the reference point for sustainable practices.

Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP)

LafargeHolcim reports on its carbon statistics every year – the results are graded by the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP). In 2018, the CDP scored LafargeHolcim with a B-grade rating in carbon emissions, which is above the industry average.

Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosure (TCFD)

LafargeHolcim has been a member of the Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosure (TCFD) since July 2017. The TCFD is gathering voluntary, consistent and climate-related risk disclosures from companies around the world. This information is then used to inform investors, insurers and stakeholders about the performance of the participating companies.

Global Alliance for Buildings and Construction (GABC)

LafargeHolcim is a founding member of the Global Alliance for Buildings and Construction (GABC). The alliance is an initiative that was launched at COP21 as part of the Lima Paris Action Agenda. It aims to mobilise all stakeholders, including member states and non-state actors from the building and construction industry, to scale up climate actions in the sector.

These are some of the global initiatives and alliances in which LafargeHolcim is a member and participant. They encourage ethical, responsible and developmental business practices with real accountability. We are proud to be part of these initiatives around the world in order to advance the building materials industry and our worldwide operations.

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LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges. 

___

LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring countries with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in Mbeya, Southwest Tanzania.

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At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

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Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest for the best tips on construction, handy projects and the latest industry news. See our Instagram channel for more insights into our products.

Tembo cement: a sustainable building material

Tembo cement: a sustainable building material

LafargeHolcim Tanzania manufactures a wide range of high-quality cement products at our Mbeya cement facility. These products are sold under the Tembo cement brand – a market leader in building materials and sustainability. Retailers, contractors and infrastructure specialists will benefit from using any Tembo cement for their construction projects.

Cement is used to make concrete; when mixed with water, sand and crushed stone, cement forms concrete which hardens when it dries. This is a highly durable building material that is kind to the environment. It produces no hazardous byproducts and does not threaten the environment – that is why concrete is such a popular substance for building.

A sustainable approach to construction with Tembo cement products will bring lasting environmental and economic benefits to contractors. LafargeHolcim Tanzania can assure the quality of Tembo cement products as they are specifically engineered using advanced admixtures and abundant raw minerals

Concrete is the natural choice for sustainable building construction. Tembo cement is safe to use and has long-lasting benefits for buildings as it will not rust, rot or burn. Once a building has reached the end of its life, the concrete can be broken down into rubble and recycled for other building projects. This means that concrete can be reused over and over again. 

Each market in the construction sector has its own needs. Tembo cement has a product that is suited to each of these needs and application, from high-strength and quick-setting cement to masonry and general purpose cement. Our products are sustainable and perfectly suited to any civil engineering application.

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LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges. 

___

LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring countries with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in Mbeya, Southwest Tanzania.

___

At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

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Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest for the best tips on construction, handy projects and the latest industry news. See our Instagram channel for more insights into our products.

LafargeHolcim Group launches ‘Plants for Tomorrow’

LafargeHolcim Group launches Plants for Tomorrow

The global LafargeHolcim Group is on a mission to upgrade all of its cement manufacturing facilities around the world. This drive, called ‘Plants for Tomorrow’, will see over 270 integrated cement plants and grinding mills being upgraded with the latest artificial intelligence and automation technology.

Cement manufacturing facilities, like LafargeHolcim Tanzania’s Tembo cement plant in Mbeya, will get an overhaul of the entire production line. ‘Plants for Tomorrow’ is a four-year initiative that will take LafargeHolcim subsidiaries into the future of cement and building materials.

The upgrades to the cement plants will improve operational efficiency, meaning that these facilities will be able to produce more cement at the end of the initiative. Currently the LafargeHolcim Group is testing the upgrades on 30 pilot projects around the world, where it will iron out any issues before proceeding with a full-scale rollout.

Transforming the cement industry through technology

“Transforming the way we produce cement is one of the focus areas of our digitalisation strategy and the ‘Plants of Tomorrow’ initiative will turn Industry 4.0 into reality at our plants,” says LafargeHolcim global head of cement manufacturing Solomon Baumgartner.

“These innovative solutions make cement production safer, more efficient and environmentally-fit. We are moving to fully data-driven operations in order to support further profitable growth as part of our Strategy 2022 – ‘Building for Growth’,” he explains.

Some of the new technologies to be installed at cement plants

A number of new technologies will be installed at cement manufacturing facilities, such as predictive operations systems that will be able to detect any problems with the production process and implement solutions instantly. This will help to reduce maintenance costs and minimise any downtime of the facilities due to breakdowns. 

The technology will also help to further reduce energy consumption at these facilities. Production lines will become more automated to reduce risks for employees in high-exposure areas of the facilities. 

LafargeHolcim is also planning on using drones to inspect chimney stacks and inaccessible regions of the cement plants. This will allow more frequent inspections to take place while also reducing costs and improving safety standards.

The group is connecting cement plants to a central network

The LafargeHolcim Group is in the process of link all of its global cement manufacturing facilities to a centralised network, dubbed the ‘Technical Information System’. Over 80% of these facilities have already been linked to this system that is able to track performance and allocate resources where necessary.

The Technical Information System also provides specific data at plant, country, region and global levels. This has allowed LafargeHolcim to start building a valuable bank of historical data that can be used to improve efficiency and performance in the future. Since the launch of the Technical Information System in 2006, it has saved LafargeHolcim 184.7-billion TZS in maintenance costs and added around 3-million tonnes of cement through efficient operations.

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LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges. 

___

LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring countries with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in Mbeya, Southwest Tanzania.

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At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

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Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest for the best tips on construction, handy projects and the latest industry news. See our Instagram channel for more insights into our products.

Concrete for roads and driveways

Concrete can be used to build roads

Concrete is becoming a more popular choice for civil engineers and road builders. Previously, asphalt was the favoured material for building roads but concrete has some unique qualities and benefits that make it a good choice. The three main benefits of using concrete to build roads and driveways are its strength, durability and sustainability.

Another major reason why concrete is becoming a popular road material is its cost-effectiveness over the long-term. Concrete roads will cost a similar price to tar roads, but they will need less maintenance and are less susceptible to potholes over a long period of time. Concrete is a good investment for roads, driveways and parking lots. 

Benefits of concrete for roads and driveways

1. Strength

On average, a road will last between 20 and 25 years before it needs to be completely resurfaced. Roads often need major repairs within the first seven years of their life. Concrete, on the other hand, is a much stronger building material. Concrete roads can last up to 50 years before needing major repairs.

This is due to the strength of concrete. These roads often outlast their initial lifespan. Concrete is designed to last long and withstand lots of wear and tear. This is important for road that need to support heavy vehicles and the friction of rubber tyres.

2. Durability

This brings us to our next point; concrete is durable enough to withstand years of punishment from daily traffic. It is a highly durable material that does not crack or crumble under the weight of vehicles. Concrete can also withstand rain and hot weather, which means fewer potholes.

Concrete has the ability to spread the weight of traffic evenly, which minimises the pressure on the internal structures of the road. Normal roads cannot do this as easily, which is why they are less durable and more susceptible to cracks and potholes. This leads to earlier repair and maintenance needs for normal roads.

3. Sustainability

Concrete is highly sustainable and 100% recyclable. Old concrete structures can be broken down into rubble, which is then reused on new building sites. Concrete is the most widely-recycled construction material. It is also environmentally-friendly, for a number of reasons.

Concrete roads have a light grey colour which is highly reflective. Unlike black road surfaces, concrete roads reflect the sun’s radiation which helps to cool the surface temperature of the road. This is better for vehicle tyres and surrounding buildings – it helps to keep cities and towns cool. Concrete is also manufactured from recyclable natural materials, such as fly ash from coal-fired power stations.

4. Affordability

Concrete is an affordable building material – that is why it is so popular. During its lifetime, a concrete road will cost the government and taxpayer less to maintain and use.

These reasons highlight why concrete is a better building material for roads and pavements. Concrete is relatively inexpensive, but it offers far more advantages over its lifetime. It is strong, durable, sustainable and affordable – ideal for any construction project, including roads.

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LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges. 

___

LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring countries with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in Mbeya, Southwest Tanzania.

___

At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

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How is sustainable construction shaping the cities of the future?

Sustainable cities of the future

African cities are experiencing rapid urbanisation as more people move into these areas. They are fast becoming densely populated and, with it, comes an increase in energy consumption and waste. So, how can our buildings help to keep our cities sustainable in the future?

If we look at the ideal circular economy, the waste we produce is converted into useful products once again, such as energy or reusable goods. Nature is the perfect example of a circular economy – there is no wastage and everything recycles into the circle of life. Architects, engineers and contractors can learn from nature and make our cities more sustainable.

Our cities are likely to be a lot more green in the future. Trees and plants will be planted wherever possible to control air quality and naturally filter carbon emissions out of the atmosphere. Buildings are likely to have their own source of electricity from solar panels and wind turbines. 

Wastewater and sewage will be filtered and processed to create usable water for washing, watering plants and for use in cooling systems. Our buildings will also harness rainwater for drinking. These are some of the ways in which sustainable construction will shape African cities in the future.

Abundance of trees on rooftops

Research has shown that not only do trees have the obvious benefit of removing greenhouse gases from the air, they can also increase the longevity of building rooftops by protecting them from sun damage and severe weather. The lifespan of a flat roof can be doubled by planting trees on top of buildings. 

These trees will improve the air quality in city centres where excessive carbon emissions from vehicles and industry are pumped into the atmosphere. They can help to combat the effects of climate change and protect the buildings beneath them at the same time. Making buildings last longer also results in less construction waste and a more circular economy.

Recycling water in cities

One of the key features of sustainable construction will be the management of water. Tanzania is prone to droughts and saving water will become a priority for citizens. Buildings in the future will have rainwater catchment systems and filters that allow them to store clean drinking water for residents.

In addition, they are likely to have their own wastewater processing plants. This technology is already being used in Africa, whereby used water from baths, sinks, washing machines and toilets is filtered and treated to create ‘clean’ (but not drinkable) water for use in the household. This greywater can be used to wash, mop and water gardens, which saves the clean drinking water for human consumption.

Harnessing renewable energy

Sustainable construction should carry the benefits forward in the lifespan of a building. This means using renewable sources of energy to generate electricity for residents. Africa is a sunny continent, which means that the use of solar panels to create energy is a viable alternative to coal-fired power stations.

Each building in the city of the future is likely to become self-sufficient. They will have a combination of solar and wind power, backed up by large banks of batteries to store the excess energy created. Harnessing renewable sources of energy will minimise our dependence on coal and water to generate electricity, creating sustainable economies in the process.

These are just some of the ways in which sustainable construction will shape the cities of the future. By tackling several environmental issues at once, skyscrapers and apartment blocks will greatly reduce the impact of human activity on the environment. Most of these sustainable systems will also help cities and citizens to save money and lead more environmentally-friendly lifestyles.

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LafargeHolcim is a leading building materials and solutions company that has been operating in international markets for decades. We produce cement and aggregates for construction projects, ranging from small affordable housing developments to large-scale infrastructure projects such as high-rise buildings, dams and bridges. 

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LafargeHolcim Tanzania has been supplying the country and neighbouring countries with our world-class Tembo cement brand for over 30 years. Our head office and fully-integrated plant are located in Mbeya, Southwest Tanzania.

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At LafargeHolcim Tanzania, we believe customers come first. We listen to your specific requirements to supply and develop the best solutions for your needs. As the new leader in building materials, you can also rely on our cutting-edge research and development capabilities that have resulted in the finest materials for your construction projects, whether large or small.

___

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest for the best tips on construction, handy projects and the latest industry news. See our Instagram channel for more insights into our products.